PVI Uganda New Documentary


Do you want to find Happiness? Do you want to find fulfillment? I chose to volunteer and found happiness. PVI  Uganda provides a platform for local and International volunteers to work in Uganda(Africa).Check out our Documentary and revisit our redesigned website

Website:http://www.pviuganda.org/

PVI Uganda Documentary

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THE TRAGEDY OF AN UNSUNG HERO AND HER TWINS


“It is our vocation to save life. It involves risk, but when we serve with love, that is when the risk does not matter so much. When we believe our mission is to save lives, we have got to do our work.”

These were the words of Dr. Mathew Lukwiya in the year 2000. He was trying to rally the support of his physicians and nurses whom he had recognized were not willing to work under such dangerous situation of the Ebola epidemic in Gulu, northern Uganda.

Dr. Lukwiya Mathew was the medical superintendent of Lacor hospital. He eventually died of the viral Ebola disease. He is now a national Hero in Uganda. When Dr. Lukwiya died, he didn’t die alone. Listening to his words was a young nurse Ms Olanya Christine. Just like Dr. Lukwiya, Christine listened and sacrificed her life for others to live when nurses kept off to be able to keep a live and bring up their children to realize their dreams. Christine knew the risk she was putting her self in, she loved her twin daughters as much as others loved their children but she placed her people and her country before her own children. She had hopes that her love would be reciprocated by another good Samaritan who would take care of her twins if she didn’t make it. She listened to Dr. Lukwiya and had the courage to face death in saving lives. She was a good servant to her master.

Like fate would have it, she also died in the process. Little did she know that a decade later her twins would be abandoned in a grass-thatched hut at the age of 16 waiting for male predators to take advantage of them. In her love and kindness as a loyal servant to her master, she did not know that her children will also drop out of school just a decade after she is gone. Today these beautiful twins Acen Caroline and Apio Catherine can barely feed themselves or dress up like children to hide their dignity. They have also dropped out like their mother in senior four because its then that she conceived. Will they conceive and loss every dream her patriotic mother had for them? Will they blame their mother for her courage and love for career and country? It’s only their souls and their God who can tell. Today, its Christine’s children, tomorrow it will be one of us. Should this vicious cycle of misfortune follow the African child because we care less?

Every week, I write about happiness. I am not happy. Yet I know doing good for others makes me happy. I have chosen to share with you the plight of two young girls who could have been your daughters or a friend to your daughter. They could have grown to be Doctors like their mother to save your life or the life of your children. I have committed my self to look for where they should stay and have what to eat. I am asking for any good Samaritan or person of good will to support their education. I don’t do this because I have much but I do this because I am a parent. I would have done the same like her mother if I had been called to serve my country and humanity. Only $ 5000 dollars could save their lives and guarantee them a future. By attaining the basic minimum education in a nearby teacher training college. Before Dr. Lukwiya died he said, “ I will continue fighting Ebola alone if necessary until the virus is beaten or until am dead”. They both died but he died with a partner. Please join me to save the life of two African girls by mailing me on mdaliker@gmail.com or call me on 256-701938508. Feel free to share or reblog this post; it could save the lives of these two beautiful daughters of my hero. In Olbert Schweiter’s words, “The only people who are truly happy are those helping others”.

Big Brother Star Game: Opportunity Picks The Prepared


“It is not often that a man can make opportunities for himself. But he can put himself in such shape that when or if the opportunities come he is ready.” –Theodore Roosevelt

On Sunday night, Big Brother Star Game season seven of the famed M-Net Reality show was launched in South Africa. Journalist Kyle Duncan Kushaba and Jannatte, a Kampala dancer, are representing Uganda.

Kyle and Jannatte were introduced and subjected to some simple and easy to anticipate questions.

Their response left many Ugandans worried and they took to social media to express their disappointment. Both Kyle and Jannatte seemed unprepared for these simple questions.

Just like in the reality show, we all develop butterflies in our stomachs whenever subjected to an interview. This could be a job interview or a press interview. continue

HAPPINESS:Why Butterflies Fly and Humans Drive


“As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler; solitude will not be solitude, poverty will not be poverty, nor weakness.” — Henry David Thoreau

Just like any adolescent, I always treasured a complex life until I got my first job. My job excitement influenced me to buy the most expensive shoes I could afford.

As I received compliments from colleagues, my boss cautioned: “simplicity shows the magnanimity of the soul.”

I later would never forget these words as life threw punches at me. My boss was the richest educationist yet the simplest teacher ever in Uganda. This was the awakening of my simplicity consciousness.

Last night, a friend told me a story of a young American who visited one of the rural village fishing sites in Africa.

He was astonished by the lifestyle of the fishing community. The Africans used sticks and strings tied to a hook to fish.

Most of them used local boats that could barely move deeper into the lake while others remained on the shores of the lake.

They spent the whole day fishing and holding conversations by the lake side. In the evening, they enjoyed the walk back home to prepare their meal.

The young American got inspired to help. He asked his parents for money to set up a fish factory.

He bought motorboats, refrigerators and sophisticated fishing tools worth millions of shillings. He anticipated that he would sell the fish and save the Africans from wasting more time.

Unfortunately, the project failed to take off after completion. The American then consulted the village elders, why the fishing community had turned down the project.

An elder told him: “Welcome to the roots of wisdom.” It’s all about the simplicity of our life style. Your project will make our lifestyle complex. The elder continued: “Your project will make the fish extinct for our grandchildren. We don’t know how to operate the machines you have brought but even if we learnt, the fish would cost us much more than we have always paid.”

The young American responded: “But I will save you a lot of time to do other things and you will have enough fish to eat whenever you need it.”

In response, another elder said: “Look, my son, the time our children spend at the fishing sites is for dating, that’s how they identify partners. Besides, we don’t practice agriculture here. If our children get more time to do nothing, they will use it to do wrong things.” CONTINUE


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WORLD HAPPINESS REPORT: Why Uganda is Ranked Happiest in E. Africa


By Aliker David martin

“The reason people find it so hard to be happy is that they always see the past better than it was, the present worst than it is, and the future less resolved than it would be” –Marcel Pagnol (French Writer, producer and Film Director1895-1974)

The UN last week released the first ever World Happiness Report.

In the report, Uganda is ranked the happiest nation in East Africa. Uganda is placed at position 128 out of 156, and followed by Rwanda at 132 out of 156 countries.

Columbia University’s Earth Institute report considered factors like economic and social support, absence of corruption and degree of personal freedom.

According to Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) Uganda’s inflation rate slumped to 21.2 percent in March from a revised 25.7 percent in February 2012.

The Central Bank of Uganda ramped up its key lending rate to 23 percent last year after inflation soared on the back of high food and fuel prices.

Uganda’s unemployment rate is at 3.5 percent and that of the youth is at a whopping 32.2 percent while for those with degrees, it’s at 36 percent.

In 2007 Transparency International ranked Uganda 117th most corrupt country out of 178 countries in the world Corruption Perception Index (CPI).

The World Bank report (2005) estimated that Uganda loses $ 300m (510b shillings) through corruption and procurement malpractices.

Last week, the government banned a pressure group Activist for Change (A4C). A4C is campaigning for good governance and freedom in Uganda.

Having mentioned all these snapshots of happiness indicators in Uganda, the question is; with all this poor record, why are Ugandans the happiest nation in East Africa? Continue

Happiness: What’s Your Purpose in Life?


As it turns out, I have been accepted to make weekly blog post on a Ugandan based online media outlet.This means instead of posting direct to my blog, I will post on Chimpreports and forward you the link to my post. I consider this a promotion of my writing skills. http://www.chimpreports.com/index.php/people/blogs/4148-nssf-suicide-what-is-your-purpose-in-life.html