THE TRAGEDY OF AN UNSUNG HERO AND HER TWINS


“It is our vocation to save life. It involves risk, but when we serve with love, that is when the risk does not matter so much. When we believe our mission is to save lives, we have got to do our work.”

These were the words of Dr. Mathew Lukwiya in the year 2000. He was trying to rally the support of his physicians and nurses whom he had recognized were not willing to work under such dangerous situation of the Ebola epidemic in Gulu, northern Uganda.

Dr. Lukwiya Mathew was the medical superintendent of Lacor hospital. He eventually died of the viral Ebola disease. He is now a national Hero in Uganda. When Dr. Lukwiya died, he didn’t die alone. Listening to his words was a young nurse Ms Olanya Christine. Just like Dr. Lukwiya, Christine listened and sacrificed her life for others to live when nurses kept off to be able to keep a live and bring up their children to realize their dreams. Christine knew the risk she was putting her self in, she loved her twin daughters as much as others loved their children but she placed her people and her country before her own children. She had hopes that her love would be reciprocated by another good Samaritan who would take care of her twins if she didn’t make it. She listened to Dr. Lukwiya and had the courage to face death in saving lives. She was a good servant to her master.

Like fate would have it, she also died in the process. Little did she know that a decade later her twins would be abandoned in a grass-thatched hut at the age of 16 waiting for male predators to take advantage of them. In her love and kindness as a loyal servant to her master, she did not know that her children will also drop out of school just a decade after she is gone. Today these beautiful twins Acen Caroline and Apio Catherine can barely feed themselves or dress up like children to hide their dignity. They have also dropped out like their mother in senior four because its then that she conceived. Will they conceive and loss every dream her patriotic mother had for them? Will they blame their mother for her courage and love for career and country? It’s only their souls and their God who can tell. Today, its Christine’s children, tomorrow it will be one of us. Should this vicious cycle of misfortune follow the African child because we care less?

Every week, I write about happiness. I am not happy. Yet I know doing good for others makes me happy. I have chosen to share with you the plight of two young girls who could have been your daughters or a friend to your daughter. They could have grown to be Doctors like their mother to save your life or the life of your children. I have committed my self to look for where they should stay and have what to eat. I am asking for any good Samaritan or person of good will to support their education. I don’t do this because I have much but I do this because I am a parent. I would have done the same like her mother if I had been called to serve my country and humanity. Only $ 5000 dollars could save their lives and guarantee them a future. By attaining the basic minimum education in a nearby teacher training college. Before Dr. Lukwiya died he said, “ I will continue fighting Ebola alone if necessary until the virus is beaten or until am dead”. They both died but he died with a partner. Please join me to save the life of two African girls by mailing me on mdaliker@gmail.com or call me on 256-701938508. Feel free to share or reblog this post; it could save the lives of these two beautiful daughters of my hero. In Olbert Schweiter’s words, “The only people who are truly happy are those helping others”.

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